Reading Workplace Parking Survey

Reading Borough Council would like to hear from businesses within the area on their current parking usage and requirements. Please complete the survey below to help us better understand workplace parking in Reading and how travel for work could be improved.

Closes Friday 30th August 2019 Submit your comments

Frequently Asked Questions

Why am I being asked to complete this survey?

Reading Borough Council would like to understand current levels of parking provision and demand for parking in private car parks within the borough. This information will inform the ongoing development of our Local Transport Plan, and shape the Councils future Transport strategies to provide capacity for  growth and development.

The Council currently has a Car Parking Strategy that covers public car parks across the borough and is responsible for the managing Controlled Parking Zones (CPZs) and resident permit scheme. By gaining an understanding of the level of private car parking provision, the Council will have a better idea of car parking requirements borough wide.

What information will be collected through the survey?

During the survey visit, trained survey staff from Project Centre Ltd will visit the site of each employer with private parking and record:

  • how many employers there are within the study area and the number of parking spaces each one provides for employees.
  • how many of these parking spaces are occupied during a typical workday.
  • Information on provision of Disabled Parking Bays, Visitor Spaces etc. The process will also provide employer’s an opportunity to share their views on key transport issues facing Reading and how they would like these to be addressed through the online survey.

What information will NOT be collected through the survey?

The survey will not collect any personal information or data such as vehicle registration, specification or type.

When will the surveys take place?

Surveys will take place between a Tuesdays and Thursdays and between 10:00 and 16:00 in order to record the average daytime occupation of car parks taking account of flexible working patterns. Surveys will be undertaken in school term time starting towards the end of June 2019 and running through to July 2019.

Can I speak further to anyone?

If you have any further questions about the background and scope to the survey you can contact Reading Borough Council on transport@reading.gov.uk If you would like to discuss the survey visit specifically you can contact Project Centre on readingparkingsurvey@projectcentre.co.uk

What will be the output from these surveys?

The data from these surveys and subsequent analysis and reporting will assist the Council in the development of its new Local Transport Plan. The plan will include borough-wide strategies for car parking and air quality. It will also help with traffic management measures, particularly to address through traffic using Reading as a short cut with no origin, destination or purpose in the borough. Strategies which may form part of the plan, and which are already in operation in other parts of the country, include possible ‘demand management’ measures such as a Congestion Charge, Workplace Parking Levy (WPL) and / or Clean Air Zone (CAZ). It is important to emphasise that no decision on future options has been taken at this time.

What is the proposed area?

The Council is considering the whole of the Reading Borough area, as shown in the map below.

How soon will any new schemes be delivered?

This summer we will launch a major public consultation exercise asking people and organisations for ideas on how to meet the challenge. Businesses will be invited to take part, so please look out for details nearer the time. When all responses are considered, the final result will be Reading Borough Council’s new Local Transport Plan – a plan to manage Reading’s transport network over the next 20 years. The introduction of any of the Demand Management Measures mentioned in the LTP will require a statutory process to progress which would include a further extensive public consultation.

Why does the Council need to develop a new Transport Strategy?

Like many major urban areas Reading already has a severely congested transport network and is experiencing slower and less reliable journey times to previous years. Transport congestion also brings  major environmental concerns, including air quality issues. The Council has recently declared a climate emergency which aims to completely eliminate carbon dioxide emissions in Reading by 2030. Reading and the surrounding boroughs are also forecast to grow significantly over the next 10 years and therefore the pressure on the transport network will only increase. The Council therefore needs to develop its Transport Strategy to deliver new schemes and generate funding to manage the transport network better.

Why can’t Central Government just pay for these improvements from existing taxes on businesses?

There are currently significant existing constraints on public spending. Such funds that are available from central and regional government usually require a contribution or ‘match’ funding from the Local Authority (Reading Borough Council). If the Council were to bid for funding, having a source of revenue from a Demand Management Measure as a contribution or ‘match’ would help the application. There is a range of other funding options that could support future transport improvements alongside this revenue, such as:

  • Contributions from property developers through the planning process.
  • Contributions in the form of grants from Government bodies (e.g. Department for Transport).
  • Borrowing (from public or private sector) repaid through increased income from new businesses.

More about Demand Management Measures

There are several types of demand management scheme which could be implemented:

What is a Congestion Charge?

 A Congestion Charge is a charge that once paid enables vehicles to enter a particular charging zone. The Congestion Charge is designed to encourage motorists to use other modes of transport and the revenue generated from the charge must be spent on further improvements to the transport network.

The nearest example of a Congestion Charge in operation is in London where an £11.50 daily tariff is in place and on payment enables motorists to drive around, leave and re-enter the charging zone as many times as required in one day. The money made from the tariff is reinvested across London’s transport network.

 

What is a Clean Air Zone (CAZ)?

A Clean Air Zone (CAZ) or Low Emission Zone (LEZ) is an area in which a local authority has brought measures into place to improve the air quality and address sources of pollution. There can be two types of Clean Air Zone: non-charging and charging.

In a non-charging Clean Air Zone, the focus is on improving air quality, without charging money for vehicles entering the zone. Measures can include retrofitting certain vehicles; traffic flow management to reduce vehicle emissions where evidence suggests this approach would be effective on the road in question; rerouting some traffic or other local solutions.

In a charging zone, drivers will be charged a fee to enter the area if their vehicle fails to meet the required environmental standards – this will most likely be based on a car’s Euro emissions standard.

Birmingham, Southampton and Bath are all considering introducing a Clean Air Zones while Oxford already has a Clean Air Zone in its central area and London has recently introduced an Ultra-Low Emission Zone.

 

What is a workplace parking levy (WPL)?

A workplace parking levy (WPL) is a charge made by a local authority on employers for the number of parking spaces (‘workplace parking’) provided for employees. Workplace parking spaces include only those parking spaces that are regularly occupied by an employee or regular business visitor and hence unused parking spaces are not subject to the levy or parking used by occasional business visitors or customers.

Any money raised from a WPL scheme is ring-fenced for investment in local transport improvements. The nearest example of a WPL scheme in operation is in Nottingham where the revenue generated from the scheme has led to the major expansion of the city’s tram network.

Privacy Notice

This consultation is being carried out by Project Centre Limited for and on behalf of Reading Borough Council.

All personal data submitted in connection with the consultation is processed by Project Centre Limited on behalf of Reading Borough Council.

Reading Borough Council’s Privacy Notice, which explains how personal data submitted in connection with this consultation is used is available on their website.

Frequently Asked Questions

Frequently Asked Questions

Why am I being asked to complete this survey?

Reading Borough Council would like to understand current levels of parking provision and demand for parking in private car parks within the borough. This information will inform the ongoing development of our Local Transport Plan, and shape the Councils future Transport strategies to provide capacity for  growth and development.

The Council currently has a Car Parking Strategy that covers public car parks across the borough and is responsible for the managing Controlled Parking Zones (CPZs) and resident permit scheme. By gaining an understanding of the level of private car parking provision, the Council will have a better idea of car parking requirements borough wide.

What information will be collected through the survey?

During the survey visit, trained survey staff from Project Centre Ltd will visit the site of each employer with private parking and record:

  • how many employers there are within the study area and the number of parking spaces each one provides for employees.
  • how many of these parking spaces are occupied during a typical workday.
  • Information on provision of Disabled Parking Bays, Visitor Spaces etc. The process will also provide employer’s an opportunity to share their views on key transport issues facing Reading and how they would like these to be addressed through the online survey.

What information will NOT be collected through the survey?

The survey will not collect any personal information or data such as vehicle registration, specification or type.

When will the surveys take place?

Surveys will take place between a Tuesdays and Thursdays and between 10:00 and 16:00 in order to record the average daytime occupation of car parks taking account of flexible working patterns. Surveys will be undertaken in school term time starting towards the end of June 2019 and running through to July 2019.

Can I speak further to anyone?

If you have any further questions about the background and scope to the survey you can contact Reading Borough Council on transport@reading.gov.uk If you would like to discuss the survey visit specifically you can contact Project Centre on readingparkingsurvey@projectcentre.co.uk

What will be the output from these surveys?

The data from these surveys and subsequent analysis and reporting will assist the Council in the development of its new Local Transport Plan. The plan will include borough-wide strategies for car parking and air quality. It will also help with traffic management measures, particularly to address through traffic using Reading as a short cut with no origin, destination or purpose in the borough. Strategies which may form part of the plan, and which are already in operation in other parts of the country, include possible ‘demand management’ measures such as a Congestion Charge, Workplace Parking Levy (WPL) and / or Clean Air Zone (CAZ). It is important to emphasise that no decision on future options has been taken at this time.

What is the proposed area?

The Council is considering the whole of the Reading Borough area, as shown in the map below.

How soon will any new schemes be delivered?

This summer we will launch a major public consultation exercise asking people and organisations for ideas on how to meet the challenge. Businesses will be invited to take part, so please look out for details nearer the time. When all responses are considered, the final result will be Reading Borough Council’s new Local Transport Plan – a plan to manage Reading’s transport network over the next 20 years. The introduction of any of the Demand Management Measures mentioned in the LTP will require a statutory process to progress which would include a further extensive public consultation.

Why does the Council need to develop a new Transport Strategy?

Like many major urban areas Reading already has a severely congested transport network and is experiencing slower and less reliable journey times to previous years. Transport congestion also brings  major environmental concerns, including air quality issues. The Council has recently declared a climate emergency which aims to completely eliminate carbon dioxide emissions in Reading by 2030. Reading and the surrounding boroughs are also forecast to grow significantly over the next 10 years and therefore the pressure on the transport network will only increase. The Council therefore needs to develop its Transport Strategy to deliver new schemes and generate funding to manage the transport network better.

Why can’t Central Government just pay for these improvements from existing taxes on businesses?

There are currently significant existing constraints on public spending. Such funds that are available from central and regional government usually require a contribution or ‘match’ funding from the Local Authority (Reading Borough Council). If the Council were to bid for funding, having a source of revenue from a Demand Management Measure as a contribution or ‘match’ would help the application. There is a range of other funding options that could support future transport improvements alongside this revenue, such as:

  • Contributions from property developers through the planning process.
  • Contributions in the form of grants from Government bodies (e.g. Department for Transport).
  • Borrowing (from public or private sector) repaid through increased income from new businesses.
More about Demand Management Measures

More about Demand Management Measures

There are several types of demand management scheme which could be implemented:

What is a Congestion Charge?

 A Congestion Charge is a charge that once paid enables vehicles to enter a particular charging zone. The Congestion Charge is designed to encourage motorists to use other modes of transport and the revenue generated from the charge must be spent on further improvements to the transport network.

The nearest example of a Congestion Charge in operation is in London where an £11.50 daily tariff is in place and on payment enables motorists to drive around, leave and re-enter the charging zone as many times as required in one day. The money made from the tariff is reinvested across London’s transport network.

 

What is a Clean Air Zone (CAZ)?

A Clean Air Zone (CAZ) or Low Emission Zone (LEZ) is an area in which a local authority has brought measures into place to improve the air quality and address sources of pollution. There can be two types of Clean Air Zone: non-charging and charging.

In a non-charging Clean Air Zone, the focus is on improving air quality, without charging money for vehicles entering the zone. Measures can include retrofitting certain vehicles; traffic flow management to reduce vehicle emissions where evidence suggests this approach would be effective on the road in question; rerouting some traffic or other local solutions.

In a charging zone, drivers will be charged a fee to enter the area if their vehicle fails to meet the required environmental standards – this will most likely be based on a car’s Euro emissions standard.

Birmingham, Southampton and Bath are all considering introducing a Clean Air Zones while Oxford already has a Clean Air Zone in its central area and London has recently introduced an Ultra-Low Emission Zone.

 

What is a workplace parking levy (WPL)?

A workplace parking levy (WPL) is a charge made by a local authority on employers for the number of parking spaces (‘workplace parking’) provided for employees. Workplace parking spaces include only those parking spaces that are regularly occupied by an employee or regular business visitor and hence unused parking spaces are not subject to the levy or parking used by occasional business visitors or customers.

Any money raised from a WPL scheme is ring-fenced for investment in local transport improvements. The nearest example of a WPL scheme in operation is in Nottingham where the revenue generated from the scheme has led to the major expansion of the city’s tram network.

Privacy Notice

Privacy Notice

This consultation is being carried out by Project Centre Limited for and on behalf of Reading Borough Council.

All personal data submitted in connection with the consultation is processed by Project Centre Limited on behalf of Reading Borough Council.

Reading Borough Council’s Privacy Notice, which explains how personal data submitted in connection with this consultation is used is available on their website.

Have your say

Please fill in the survey below by 30th June 2019.

If you have any further questions about the background and scope of the survey, please contact Reading Borough Council on transport@reading.gov.uk.

If you would like to discuss the survey visit specifically, please contact contact Project Centre on readingparkingsurvey@projectcentre.co.uk.

 


Reading Business Parking Survey
Please correct any required fields and submit again.
Business Name
This question is required
How do the majority of your employees travel to work?
Please select an option
What do you think are the main issues in relation to transport in Reading? (Pick 3)
Overall congestion of highway network resulting in slow journey times and poor journey time reliability; Air quality issues caused by transport modes; Lack of adequate public transport options; Poor walking and cycling links across the borough; Affordability of public transport options; Lack of adequate parking provision across the borough; Addressing the Climate Change Emergency and contributing to the Council’s commitment of eliminating carbon dioxide emissions in Reading by 2030;
This question is required
What do you think the Council should be doing to address these issues? (Pick 3)
Providing better journey reliability through reallocation of road space to public transport routes, priority lanes for users of electric vehicles, multi-occupancy lanes etc; Address the air quality issues caused by transport modes by introducing a Clean Air Zone (CAZ) or Low Emission Zone (LEZ); Introduce a Road-User Charge or Work Place Parking Levy to encourage mode shift to sustainable transport use and provide revenue source to promote sustainable transport use; Improving the number and quality of Park and Ride facilities across the borough; Build Third Thames Crossing to provide for through traffic, removing it from central Reading and IDR (will include locally derived measures to help fund); Provide more charging points for electric vehicles and promoting electric vehicle use; Provide more comprehensive segregated cycle network; Provide better and safer walking links;
This question is required
Do you currently promote sustainable transport measures through any of the following?
This question is required
Do you have any other comments on the transport provison within Reading?
This question is required